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No evidence of a STEM worker shortage?

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No evidence of a STEM worker shortage?

Center for Immigration Studies report conflicts with a widely-held sentiment.

In most surveys of middle market companies over the past few years, a major concern of CEOs has been the increasing unavailability of skilled workers in the US marketplace. This concern has been borne out in surveys of larger companies well.

"This may be a great situation for employers, but it is hard to see how this in the best long-term interest of the American people."

However, a new report from the Center for Immigration Studies concludes that – at least among the higher-end “STEM” segment – such concerns are overblown.  (Note: the CIS advocates against liberalized immigration policies, particularly with respect to illegal immigration.) 

Herewith, the CIS’ write-up of the findings: 

While employers argue that there are not enough workers with science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) degrees, a new analysis of government data by the Center for Immigration Studies finds no evidence that a general shortage of such workers exists. Consistent with most research on the subject, the findings show that the country has more than twice as many people with STEM degrees as there are STEM jobs. Also consistent with most other research on the subject, we find only modest levels of wage growth for such workers for more than a decade. Both employment and wage data indicate STEM workers are not in short supply in the United States.

"By allowing in many more immigrants than the STEM labor market can absorb, Congress is almost certainly holding down wage growth, crowding natives out of these jobs, and reducing the incentive for Americans to undertake the challenging course work necessary for a STEM career," said Dr. Steven Camarota, the Center's Director of Research and co-author of the report. "This may be a great situation for employers, but it is hard to see how this in the best long-term interest of the American people."

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