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Millennials know job-hopping looks bad, but they don’t care

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Millennials know job-hopping looks bad, but they don’t care

New survey highlights millennial sentiment on career decisions and how this impacts their employers.

A recent survey by crowdsourced talent acquisition provider RecruitiFi found that although 83% of millennials acknowledge that job hopping on their resume has the potential to be negatively perceived by prospective employers, 86% say that it would not prevent them from pursuing their professional or personal passions.

"The millennial generation continues to be at the forefront of every recruiting and hiring discussion," said Brin McCagg, CEO and Co-founder of RecruitiFi. "By taking a deep dive into the key drivers behind millennials' career decisions, the survey findings illustrate that now, more than ever, organizations must evolve to adopt more strategic approaches to HR and talent management."

"The millennial generation continues to be at the forefront of every recruiting and hiring discussion."

The Millennial Job Hop  
During the course of their professional careers, 53% of millennials surveyed have held three or more jobs. And while many have plans to stay in their current jobs for 3-5 years (33%), many respondents plan to leave after 1-2 years (20%).

When asked for the main reason they would leave their company, millennials responded saying they would leave to pursue a completely different career path (37%), take a job with a competitor (25%) and/or relocate to try living in a different city (22%). Only 11% would leave their current organization to relocate due of a significant other and 5% said they would leave to take time off for personal travel.

Impact on Employers  
Respondents echoed industry sentiments that "job hopping" has become the new normal. In fact, 55% of those surveyed acknowledged this claim and explained that "job hopping" has not negatively impacted their organizations. However, of the individuals that have witnessed the negative implications, 34% noted a lowered employee morale in the office and 22% explained that their clients/customers have taken notice.

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